Fig Variety Details

General

Variety
Pissalutto
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NPGS ID
DFIC 189
AKA

Binello, Pissalutto Bianco, Pitalusse, Pittalusse Blanche, Poussouluda, Sarnese Bianco

Description

Accession was donated. 06-May-2002. California United States. Donors: Schafer, Patrick, Kennedy, Todd, California Rare Fruit Growers.

Comment: Donated to NCGR, Davis. According to Kennedy, fig came from old University of California, Riverside Citrus Experiment Station, and he received through P. Schafer.

Condit Monograph

Pissalutto: (syns. Pissalutto Bianco, Pitalusse, Pittalusse Blanche, Poussouluda, Sarnese Bianco). Described by Gallesio (1817), Semmola (1845), Pasquale (1876), Du Breuil (1876), Savastano (1885, probably), Sauvaigo (1889, 1894), Eisen (1888, 1901), Trabut (1904), Mingioli (1904), Mazières (1920), Blin (1942), Simonet et al. (1945), and Tamaro (1948). According to Gallesio, Pissalutto is the same variety listed by Pliny and Columella as “ficus liviana,” one of the best figs of the Roman Era, an identification which Eisen considered highly doubtful. Sarnese, described by Gasparrini (1845) and Savastano (1885), is probably the same variety. The fruit is figured by Semmola, Eisen, and Simonet. Pissalutto is commonly grown in Liguria, and is especially well liked at Sarzana, where it is called Binello; it is also reported to do well in Tuscany, Corsica, and Sardinia; according to Gasparrini, it was caprified at Naples. In southern France it is grown under the name, Pittalusse Blanche.

This variety has not been properly tested in California. P.I. Nos. 77,481 and 113,651 represented cuttings obtained from Italy as Pissalutto, but the fruit produced at Riverside did not conform to the descriptions given by Italian authors. Pitalouse, described and illustrated by Price and White in Texas, was a brown fig, and apparently a different variety from the one now under consideration. Pissalutto is a one-crop fig, very few if any brebas being produced.

The tree is reported by Gallesio to be moderately vigorous, but not so large as that of Dottato. Leaves are large and 5-lobed, with the terminal lobe considerably longer than the lateral ones. The following description is taken from that of Simonet.

Second-crop figs medium, pyriform, with prominent, slender neck, up to one inch in length; average weight 35 grams; stalk slender, often over 1/2 inch long; eye small, partly open, scales numerous, brick red; skin delicately pruinose, checking at complete maturity; color greenish yellow to golden yellow; meat white; pulp of fine texture, red. Quality good, especially fresh. Stands shipment well on account of the firm skin.

Family
TBD
Type
Common
Collection
Non-Carica
Availability
Beginner
Poor
Origin

Strains

Variety Strains

Images

Main Crop

Main Season
Main Yield
Average
Main GDD
Main Ripen Days
Main Crop Flavors
Main Additional Flavors
Main Fruit Size
30-50g
Main Seed Crunch
Main Skin Thickness
Main Eye Opening
Small
Main Eye Description
Main Fruit Drop Resistance
Average
Main Split Resistance
Main Uses
Fresh
Main Rain Tolerance
Average
Main Additional Notes

Breba Crop

Breba
Yes
Breba Yield
Breba GDD
Breba Flavor (Difference from Main)
Breba Ripening Days
Breba Fruit Size
Breba Seed Crunch
Breba Skin Thickness
Breba Eye Opening
Breba Eye Description
Breba Fruit Drop Resistance
Breba Split Resistance
Breba Uses
Breba Rain Tolerance
Average
Breba Additional Notes

Reviews

Climate

Vigor
Average
Cold Hardiness
Zone
FMV Resistance
Average
RKN Resistance
Average
Container Adaptable
Average
Rooting Ease
Average
Produces After Die-back
Average
Additional Climate Notes

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