Fig Variety Details

General

Variety
LaRadek's English Brown Turkey
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Our Figs Varieties List
n/a
NPGS ID
AKA

LaRadeks EBT, LaRadek's EBT,

Description

A form of English BT from Eastern Europe, it has survived -18F with no damage and 70% dieback (but survival) at -23F in the Czech Republic. The mother plant is planted against a foundation. In zone 5b/6a it seems to ripen brebas most years. Fruits have a sweet, fruity fig taste. Closed eye.

Reported to still produce even after temperatures of -10 to -15 F, which is astounding. In northern zones (below zone 7) the main crops will seldom ripen, but due to the high quality of the breba fruit it is not a total loss.

Condit Monograph

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Family
English Brown Turkey
Type
Common
Collection
Non-Carica
Availability
Beginner
Excellent

Strains

Variety Strains

Images

Main Crop

Main Season
Mid
Main Yield
Average
Main GDD
Main Ripen Days
Main Crop Flavors
Sugar
Main Additional Flavors
Main Fruit Size
30-50g
Main Seed Crunch
Average
Main Skin Thickness
Average
Main Eye
Conical
Main Fruit Drop Resistance
Average
Main Split Resistance
Average
Main Uses
Dried, Fresh
Main Additional Notes

Breba Crop

Breba
Yes
Breba Yield
Breba GDD
Breba Flavor (Difference from Main)
Breba Ripening Days
Breba Fruit Size
5-Giant
Breba Seed Crunch
Breba Skin Thickness
Breba Eye
Breba Fruit Drop Resistance
Breba Split Resistance
Breba Uses
Breba Additional Notes

Breba is good quality and seems to be extremely hardy, reportedly to -10 to -15 F.

Reviews

Other Comments

Robert Harper in Connecticut: This fig was discovered in a zone 6a location, in the village of Kyjovich, in the Czech Republic. It has been grown there in a protected location for 18 years. But, grown without winter cover, and still produces a breba crop. It is reported to be able to survive minus 18 degrees Fahrenheit, once it’s has reached maturity. In the brutal European winter of 2012, it lost 70% of its top at minus 23 degrees Fahrenheit. We don’t know for what reason it was 70% top killed at that temperature. It could have been heavy rains during the fall. Or, since the owner does not pinch out new growth and figs after the 6th leaf, it may have been carrying to many figs going into winter. Since figs grown in the north should be pruned back to 2 to 3 feet each spring any ways, you may still get a good crop of figs, if the temperature drops to minus 23 degrees. We just started testing it here in our zone 5b/6a location this year, (2012). So far, it has been a strong grower and starts producing figs, the same year it is rooted. In 2012 our newly rooted plant produced three figs. Newly rooted fig plants produce late figs. They also should not be allowed to bear fruit the first year or two. But, I could not wait to see what they tasted like. The taste was surprisingly good for a fig that fruited within the same year it was rooted. This fig produced for us, in late July, 2013, in a pot, two very large breba figs. So far it seems it might also be a good breba producer for those who cannot grow figs in ground. The breba fruit are so large, that I don’t think the average person could eat more the 4, at a time. Zone 5a/6a?

Climate

Vigor
High
Cold Hardiness
High
Zone
5b/6a+
FMV Resistance
Average
RKN Resistance
Average
Container Adaptable
Excellent
Rooting Ease
Excellent
Produces After Die-back
Excellent
Rain Tolerance
Average
Additional Climate Notes

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